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Let Your Brand Get Old with Your Market

Marketers work so hard to keep their brands fresh and invigorated… even “hip.” Maybe that’s a mistake. Maybe they should make their brands age.

I was reading John Caddell‘s post, “Why Didn’t GM Use Harry Potter Marketing?” In it, he points out that the books (and the movies) allow Harry Potter to grow up, so that the audience that was engaged with the first book/movie continue relate to the character as THEY aged. Brilliant!

John argues that maybe Saturn would be thriving today if the design had matured the way its demographic, who was much younger in 1990 when Saturn began, has certainly done.

What about your brands? Are they truly timeless, or has your demographic shifted over the years? Maybe being long in the tooth isn’t so bad when your market is going to be needing dentures soon.

Posted: under Creating Curiosity (Marketing).
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Comments (0) Jun 10 2009

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Conserve Marketing Budget; Develop Marketing That Sucks

By Paul Johnson

758 words. Abstract: When your goal is to achieve more sales with a meager marketing budget in a tough selling environment, it may be time to consider marketing that sucks.

Don’t get me wrong. I’m not advocating bad marketing as a way to conserve budget dollars. Good marketing — really good marketing — could be marketing that sucks. Try this and you may find yourself enjoying more sales for less marketing investment.

One Recession Create Two Problems
Attracting customers is the quest of marketing, always seeking more efficient methods that lower cost per lead and ultimately cost of customer acquisition. This becomes even more challenging in a down economy for two reasons: buyers may be fewer and more finicky, and marketing budgets often remain stagnant or are reduced.

Managing this double-headed challenge means you can’t afford to stick with the strategies that worked for you in the good times. Here’s a strategy that may not only keep you in business, but enable you to enjoy higher revenues and profits despite the recession.

A Free Lunch
This sophisticated marketing strategy is really pretty simple. In fact, the inspiration comes from a stupid fish. The remora has the ability to attach itself to larger fish using a suction organ on its back just behind its head. Not only does the remora get a free ride, but it also enjoys all the food it can eat.

Spearfish Remora

Spearfish Remora

Imagine yourself strapped to the underside of a shark when the shark decides it’s time to eat. The shark hunts down and kills its fish dinner, shredding and tearing it apart in the process. The water around the shark is now a cloud of tiny chunks of what was a healthy mackerel just a few moments ago. The pieces that are too small for the shark allow you to easily get your fill for dinner. All you need to do is open your mouth as the shark swims through the cloud of mackerel.

Shark with remora attached to its underside

Shark with remora attached to its underside

Drive-By Marketing
The remora eats well because it has a strategy that sucks. Perhaps something similar could work for you. A great example of this strategy in action is found at the Beef Jerky Outlet. When I interviewed niche marketer and owner Rick Jones for The Great Brand Rush blog, he was very clear about the most important factor affecting success of his stores.

As the store name implies, they sell different kinds of jerky, indeed a tightly focused niche within the retail food business. After all, we don’t commonly run to the store to pick up bread, milk and jerky. He understands that his target customers are primarily male outdoorsmen who are looking for portable protein snacks that won’t spoil. Rick knows that the road to success is literally the road leading to a Bass Pro Shop. Location is critical to simple and inexpensive marketing.

The Beef Jerky Outlet marketing plan is rather simple; let people who are headed to the Bass Pro Shop know there’s a Beef Jerky Outlet on the way. When I interviewed Rick, he didn’t even have a website. He relies primarily on roadside signage, including a billboard along the interstate. In fact, that’s how I first discovered the Beef Jerky Outlet.

Bass Pro Shops is really doing all the marketing work for him. They spend millions every year on advertising and brand building. They send out fliers in newspapers, maintain sophisticated websites, and engage customers with promotions and loyalty programs that keep them coming to their store. All the Beef Jerky Outlet needs are the proverbial crumbs from the Bass Pro Shop’s table to run a profitable operation.

Be the Fries
To make this strategy work for you, think about what big fish (or whale) do you “go with.” For example, people go into burger joints for the burgers, yet billions of potatoes are consumed as a byproduct. French fries are the remora, but without the fishy taste.

Maybe you won’t find it practical to change your physical location to get near the big whale that can keep you well fed, but you can change the location of your advertising. Structure your advertising approach to put you along the path to the big fish so that prospects will naturally choose to include you as part of their purchase decision. You may even want to approach these larger firms about an alliance. However, make sure you can offer plenty of benefits from your end to justify the alliance, or else your potential partner will think you’re taking them for a sucker.

Drastic changes in the economic climate demand that your rethink your marketing strategy. You can’t afford to stop marketing, and you can’t afford bad marketing, though perhaps you’ll find you can easily afford marketing that sucks.

© 2009 Paul Johnson. All rights reserved.

About The Author:
Paul Johnson of Shortcuts to Results LLC collects business shortcuts and shows people how to find and apply them for performance improvement at http://ShortcutsToResults.com. Check out the interview with niche marketing expert Rick Jones at http://NicheExpert.com.

Note: This article is available for reprint at no charge. We only ask that you include our copyright notice in your reprint, along with the About the Author information we provide at the end of the article.

A Question for your Comments: What companies have you observed playing the role of the remora?

Posted: under Creating Curiosity (Marketing).
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Comments (0) Mar 02 2009